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10,000 teens across Simcoe Muskoka still need to get HPV and Hep B vaccines

A child health nurse holds up a vial and box for the HPV vaccine, brand name Gardasil, at a clinic in Kinston, N.C., March 5, 2012. (Charles Buchanan / THE CANADIAN PRESS) A child health nurse holds up a vial and box for the HPV vaccine, brand name Gardasil, at a clinic in Kinston, N.C., March 5, 2012. (Charles Buchanan / THE CANADIAN PRESS)
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Teens born in 2008 who have not received their HPV and Hepatitis vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic will now be eligible until August of their Grade 12 year.

Health experts say HPV and Hepatitis vaccines are free and highly effective in protecting youth, now and in the future.

Although unvaccinated people can get rid of infections on their own, there is still a risk of carrying the disease, which can lead to further infections like cirrhosis, liver cancers, and death.

Public health says 75 per cent of Canadians will have an HPV infection at some point in their life. HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and can cause cancers in the throat, cervix and genitals.

People with Hepatitis B are infected through body fluids and often do not realize they have the infection until it is too late.

Anyone born in 2008 who has not yet received Hepatitis B and HPV vaccines is encouraged by The Simcoe Muskoka District Health to book an appointment at their local clinic.

For more information, contact a public health professional by calling Health Connection at 705-721-7520 or 1-877-721-7520.

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