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Tim Hortons sweetens the season with first-ever holiday Smile Cookie campaign

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The first-ever holiday smile cookie campaign kicked off Monday morning at Tim Hortons.

One hundred per cent of the proceeds from each cookie sold this week are donated to support local charities picked by Tim Hortons franchise owners.

The proceeds from the cookie campaign will be split 50/50 this holiday season to support the Barrie Food Bank and the Tim Hortons Children's Camps.

"What better time to give the money to the Barrie Food Bank? When owners were approached with the opportunity for this program, the very first word I think that came out of most of our mouths was, 'It's got to go to the Barrie Food Bank.' So, of course, it's the best time of year for that," said Johnny Mizzoni, owner of the Quarry Ridge Road Tim Hortons in Barrie.

Officials with the Barrie Food Bank said these proceeds are coming at a vital time.

"We just saw the highest numbers we've ever seen come into the food bank in October - just under 7,000 individuals being supported last month. We know as we go into the holiday season that we will see even more people.

We always try to do something a little special for holiday meals, so we're working towards doing a chicken or a turkey for the larger families. So, this is going to help us," said Sharon Palmer, Barrie Food Bank executive director.

Mizzoni said he hopes the holiday cookie campaign will be another hit in the community.

"For the last 25 years plus, Tim Hortons guests, of course, have grown to love and know our traditional smile cookie campaign. This year set a record, and so, we're hoping this first campaign of the holiday smile cookie hits about 70 or 80 per cent of that," Mizzoni said.

The holiday smile cookie campaign runs until Sunday.

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