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Defence lawyer suggests victim of deadly 2020 Hwy 12 crash had alcohol in his system

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Sigfrid Stahn sat in the courtroom on Monday as his defence lawyer tried to sway the jury to the possibility the victim, Guenter Naumann, 77, had alcohol in his system at the time of the head-on collision on Highway 12 in Waubaushene nearly three years ago.

Stahn is charged with impaired driving causing death and dangerous driving causing death in the collision on July 4, 2020.

Defence lawyer David Wilcox didn't call any evidence in the case.

Court heard that two hospital samples taken in Midland and Toronto of Naumann's blood were found to have non-detectable levels while testing from the Centre of Forensic Sciences said contradictory test results made it difficult to conclusively say how much if any, alcohol was in his system at the time of the crash.

Crown attorney Sarah Sullivan argued Stahn's pickup truck crossed the double lines at a curve in the road and crashed head-on into Naumann's convertible Mercedes.

Witnesses testified seeing a pickup truck pass another vehicle before crashing into the Mercedes, sending it airborne before it slammed onto its side on the road, telling the court the victim had little time to avoid the collision.

The Crown alleges Naumann suffered significant internal injuries before dying in the hospital a week after the crash.

Closing arguments for both sides are scheduled to begin on Thursday in a Barrie courtroom.

Justice Michael McKelvey will also instruct the jury of seven men and five women.

None of the allegations against the accused have been proven in court.

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