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Barrie police crack down on excessive speed after rise in community complaints

A speed measuring sign sits at the corner of Essa Road and Beacon Road, taken on Sun., March 19 (Molly Frommer/CTV News). A speed measuring sign sits at the corner of Essa Road and Beacon Road, taken on Sun., March 19 (Molly Frommer/CTV News).
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Barrie police are cracking down on excessive speeding on city streets after increased community complaints.

A speed measuring sign on Essa Road, near Beacon Road, has been put in place by Barrie police after a noticeable increase in reckless driving from residents nearby.

"Barrie police, from time to time, does receive complaints from the community in regards to motor vehicles travelling on city streets in what appears to be excessive speed," said Peter Leon, Barrie police spokesperson. "We have this speed measuring sign, we're able to deploy that sign to various locations throughout the city, and it as decided that Essa Road would be a good location because of an ongoing complaint that we had."

So far, officers have handed out 25 speeding tickets to drivers on Essa Road in a little over one week, with one of those vehicles impounded.

The posted limit is 50 km/h on Essa Road. But Barrie police said that stretch of roadway isn't the city's only focal point of excessive speed.

"We've had a number of occurrences on Mapleview Drive," Leon said. "Mapleview Drive is wide open from east to west and west to east. We know that it's a major entry/exit point for highway 400. We have had some very high speeds recently registered, in addition to impaired drivers being apprehended."

Barrie Police add the speed measuring sign would be moved around the city occasionally to remind drivers to pay attention to the posted speed limit. 

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